Jupiter’s impact on dinosaur extinction | Technology

Jupiter's impact on dinosaur extinction |  Technology

Includes a new theory Jupiter and its gravitational field on the path and path of the devastating object that destroyed the dinosaurs 66 million years ago.

Study of astronomy using statistical analysis and gravity simulations Harvard University Aamir Siraj | And astronomer Avi Lope Calculate the significant area of ​​long-term comets that appear from the cloud Art, An icy sphere at the edge of the solar system that can certainly be thrown away by the gravitational pull of Jupiter during its orbital motion. The results were released Natural Science Reports.

“The solar system acts as a kind of pinball machine. Jupiter, the largest planet, orbits the incoming long-range comets, which bring them very close to the Sun, ”Siraj said in a statement.

CONTEXT | Pixabay

During the path closest to the sun, comets may experience powerful wave forces that break up particles of rock and eventually form a cometary cloud.

“At the solar scraping event, The region of the comet closest to the Sun feels a stronger gravitational pull than the region farther away, Resulting in a wave force through the object, ”says Siraj.

“You can get the so-called wave disorder phenomenon, in which A large kite breaks into many smaller pieces. More importantly, on the way back to the Ort cloud, one of these pieces is more likely to hit Earth, ”says the astronomy student.

New calculations of Siraj and Loip’s theory increase the chances of that Long-lived comets affect the Earth by about 10 factors, And show that about 20% of long-term comets turn into solar scrapers.

CONTEXT | Pixabay

The pair’s new impact rate is age – appropriate, giving a satisfactory explanation for its appearance and other similar effects.

See also  Vietnam wins 16 gold medals in international math talent search

“Our article provides a basis for explaining why this phenomenon occurred,” says Lope. “In fact, we recommend that if an object breaks it as it approaches the sun, it will lead to the exact event rate and the type of attack that kills the dinosaurs.”

Evidence found in the abyss சிக்க்சுலப் The rock is said to be made of carbonaceous chondrite. Siraj and Loip’s hypothesis may explain this unusual structure.

A popular theory about the origin of the complex says it has an impact Formed in the main belt, which is the population of asteroids between the orbits of Jupiter and Mars. However, carbonaceous chondrites are rare in major belt asteroids, but they are widespread among long-term comets, providing additional support for the comet attack hypothesis.

CONTEXT | Pixabay

Other similar grooves show the same composition. This includes an object that struck about 2 billion years ago and left the Wreyford Valley in South Africa.It is the largest stabilized crater in the history of the earth and the impact left by the Zamanshin crater in Kazakhstan, the largest confirmed crater in the last million years. The researchers say that the timing of these impacts supports calculations of the expected rate of comets affected by the tidal wave.

Siraj and Loya say that is their hypothesis These grooves can be tested by further reading, Others like them and even those on the surface of the moon determine the combination of impacts. Comet-like space travel will also help.

In addition to the mix of comets, the new Vera Rubin lab in Chile can be seen disrupting long-term comet waves when it goes online next year.

See also  The SpaceX crew must have replicated the spacecraft on the ISS
CONTEXT | Pixabay

“We need to see how small fragments from the Ort cloud often reach the Earth”Says Lope. “I hope to be able to test the theory with more data on long-term comets and get better statistics, and find evidence for some of the pieces.”

Understanding this is not only important for solving a mystery in Earth’s history, but it would be important if such an event threatened the planet, Lope says. “It must have been an incredible scene, but we don’t want to see it again,” he said.

You May Also Like

About the Author: Cary Douglas

Cary Douglas is a reporter who covers everything from oil trading to China's biggest conglomerates and technology companies. Originally from Chicago, he is a graduate of New York University's business and economic reporting program.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *