Amazon employees are voting on possible unionization

Amazon employees are voting on possible unionization

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France Media Agency

After months of mobilizing some staff to organize this election, nearly 6,000 people are being invited to mail their bulletins by March 6.

The count is expected to begin on March 30, and will last for several days.

If a majority of Bessemer warehouse workers vote in favor of unionization, they will automatically be represented by the RWDSU supply union, but will not become full members until the newcomer is approved. Company agreement, negotiation between the union and the company.

Amazon is the second largest employer in the United States with 800,000 people, mostly workers and technicians in its logistics centers.

So far, attempts to arrange in warehouses have failed.

The warehouse organizing committee held a rally last weekend to persuade employees to join the RWDSU.

“We can’t overstate the importance of forming a union by Amazon workers in Alabama,” former Democratic nominee Bernie Sanders tweeted Saturday.

“They face powerful anti-union forces in the anti-union state, but their victory will benefit all workers in the United States. I am proud to be on their side.”

The Seattle group does not officially oppose the unions, but campaigns against members of its staff. In Bessemer’s case, the website “DoItWithoutDues” encourages employees not to join a potential union.

“Why pay $ 500 in membership fees? We’ll take care of you with higher pay, health insurance, optical and dental benefits and a safety team and assistance process,” the homepage says.

The company pays its employees a minimum of 30 15.30 per hour, which is more than twice the minimum wage in Alabama.

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RWDSU President Stuart Appelbaum, in particular, posted a photo of the warehouse toilets posted on Twitter, showing posters pasted on the doors inside the toilets, arguing against the union arrears.

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Cory Weinberg

About the Author: Cory Weinberg

Cory Weinberg covers the intersection of tech and cities. That means digging into how startups and big tech companies are trying to reshape real estate, transportation, urban planning, and travel. Previously, he reported on Bay Area housing and commercial real estate for the San Francisco Business Times. He received a "best young journalist" award from the National Association of Real Estate Editors.

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