Scientists have discovered an underwater lie of a large worm that existed 20 million years ago

Scientists have discovered an underwater lie of a large worm that existed 20 million years ago

The cave of the animal is L-shaped, about two meters long and two to three centimeters in diameter.

Mexico City, January 24 (RT) .- a Team of Scientists Found Fossil traces A Giant sea worm With powerful jaws that lived before 20 million years. Traces of this extinct creature were found in a purse located between layers of sedimentary rocks at the Yeliu Geological Park in Taiwan.

According to the characteristics of the invention, the tracks belonged to a type of worm that hid under the sea and jumped to explode to catch its undoubted prey with a strong bite.

The lead author of the study, Yu-Yen Ban, a PhD student in earth science at Simon Fraser University (Canada), called these burrows “horrible at first glance” and noted that they were “unique and had no trace of stained fossils.” Shown ”.

The densities of the animals are L-shaped, about two meters long and two to three centimeters in diameter. Researchers believe that part of the world belonged to a creature that inhabited the planet during the Cenozoic period under the sea.

Previously, these L-shaped burrows appeared to belong to prehistoric shrimp, but some information did not match the results of other related findings.

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“This pur is not a trait that made us realize that it was created by a worm, but a combination of traits,” said Ludwig Lowmark, co-author of the study. National Geography.

Experts’ details suggest that the top of the purse appeared to have collapsed, leaving ‘feather-like’ appearances on the rocks and that they had been reused by an animal entering and leaving.

Among other details, the researcher explained that the presence of “funnels” indicates a “violent event” that points to more dangerous predatory behavior than other creatures that slowly emerge from the sand like an organism.

The worms are “almost entirely made of soft tissue, so the chances of survival are very low,” Lowmark said.

However, many of the thorny jaws of sand worms are composed of hard proteins and may be coated with zinc, so it is best to identify them in the fossil record.

This content was published by Sinembergo with RT’s explicit authorization. See the original here. Its reproduction is prohibited.

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About the Author: Cary Douglas

Cary Douglas is a reporter who covers everything from oil trading to China's biggest conglomerates and technology companies. Originally from Chicago, he is a graduate of New York University's business and economic reporting program.

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