San Joaquin County COVID-19 hospitalization reaches new record

San Joaquin County COVID-19 hospitalization reaches new record

COVID-19 hospitals in San Joaquin County have reached a new record because the 12-district San Joaquin region has a total ICU capacity of 4.5%. Its seven hospitals have 267 COVID-19 patients, according to San Joaquin County health officials – which topped the previous peak demand list of 262 patients in July. All seven hospitals in the county report that ICUs are 118% efficient and that 56% of all ICU patients are being treated for Covit-19. KCRA3 spoke with Dr. Maggie Park, San Joaquin County Public Health Officer. Below is an excerpt from the interview. KCRA3: Now when it comes to ICU capacity in the San Joaquin region, it is in single digits. How does this compare with the last ten months of this epidemic? Dr. Park: This is a serious situation. There were only 1.9% ICU beds in our San Joaquin Valley yesterday. As a region we have returned up to 4.5% to date. That is still a very small number. KCRA3: ICU efficiency is 118% at your seven hospitals in San Joaquin County. What does this really mean? Dr. Park: What are the submission numbers for each of our seven hospitals – how many staff ICU beds are there, how many are in use. KCRA3: What if someone is involved in a car accident? Patient with a heart attack or severe COVID-19 and they need an ICU bed Where will they go? Dr. Park: Well, we do not want anyone to hesitate to go to their local, nearest emergency department. Our hospitals are ready for you, and we do not want anyone waiting with symptoms or in a medical emergency. Our ICUs know how to transfer patients. We have regions – a lot of deals, a lot of partnerships, we can create room. The Sleep Railroad has statewide access as an alternative maintenance base. Therefore, we can offset some of our patient burdens in meaningful ways. This is why the government looks to the regions because we trust our region to support us. Sometimes we go to our Greater Sacramento area. If you notice, both regions are now staying home due to low ICU counts, which is why it is so serious. Because for that we depend on each other. But when it is very low, sometimes help is not available. KCRA3: What is the cause of most of these cases? Dr. Park: So, these cases represent a lot of social dissemination. Social interaction means that people do not know. It’s just there. Therefore, COVID actually has higher transfer rates. Most people, when we contact the trail, do not know exactly where they took it. So, it really is number one. KCRA3: What are you most worried about? Dr. Park: It’s hard to say we stayed at home. But what worries me now is that people are not taking the way we went back in March so seriously at this point. So, after the end of this year we are worried that we will see a January worse than our December.

See also  Canoo is the hottest electric powered auto firm to use a ‘reverse merger’ to go community

COVID-19 hospitals in San Joaquin County have reached a new record because the 12-district San Joaquin region has a total ICU capacity of 4.5%.

Its seven hospitals have 267 COVID-19 patients, according to San Joaquin County health officials – which topped the previous peak demand list of 262 patients in July.

All seven hospitals in the county report that ICUs are 118% efficient and that 56% of all ICU patients are being treated for Covit-19.

KCRA3 spoke with Dr. Maggie Park, San Joaquin County Public Health Officer. Below is an excerpt from the interview.

KCRA3: Now when it comes to ICU capacity in the San Joaquin region, it is in single digits. How does this compare with the last ten months of this epidemic?

Dr. Park: This is a serious situation. There were only 1.9% ICU beds in our San Joaquin Valley yesterday. As a region we have returned up to 4.5% to date. That is still a very small number.

KCRA3: ICU efficiency is 118% at your seven hospitals in San Joaquin County. What does this really mean?

Dr. Park: What are the submission numbers for each of our seven hospitals – how many staff are in ICU beds and how many are in use.

KCRA3: If someone is involved in a car accident, has a heart attack or is a severe Covit-19 patient they need an ICU bed-where will they go?

Dr. Park: Well, we do not want anyone to hesitate to go to their local, nearest emergency department. Our hospitals are ready for you, and we do not want anyone waiting with symptoms or in a medical emergency.

See also  60 million doses of J&J vaccine wasted by an American factory

Our ICUs know how to transfer patients. We have regions – a lot of deals, a lot of partnerships, we can create room. The Sleep Railroad has statewide access as an alternative maintenance base. Therefore, some of our patient burdens can be offset in meaningful ways.

This is why the government looks at the regions because we trust our region to support us. Sometimes we go to our Greater Sacramento area. If you notice, both regions are now staying home due to low ICU counts, which is why it is so serious. Because for that we depend on each other. But when it is very low, sometimes help is not available.

KCRA3: What is the cause of most of these cases?

Dr. Park: So, these cases represent a lot of social spread. Social interaction means that people do not know. It’s just there. Therefore, COVID actually has higher transfer rates. Most people, when we contact the trail, do not know exactly where they took it. So, it really comes first.

KCRA3: What are you most worried about?

Dr. Park: It is very difficult to say that we are staying at home. But what worries me now is that people didn’t take this so seriously the way we came back in March.

So, I’m worried that we will see January after the end of the year, which may be worse than our December.

You May Also Like

About the Author: Cory Weinberg

Cory Weinberg covers the intersection of tech and cities. That means digging into how startups and big tech companies are trying to reshape real estate, transportation, urban planning, and travel. Previously, he reported on Bay Area housing and commercial real estate for the San Francisco Business Times. He received a "best young journalist" award from the National Association of Real Estate Editors.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *