England Night Club Operator Deltic Group on the Edge of Management | Business

Deltic Group, the UK’s largest nightclub operator, is on the verge of management struggling to secure a ransom.

With less than 1,500 people, the group operates 52 bars and nightclubs, including Attic, Prism, Eden and Bar & Beyond Chains. Seeks new investment Since October after being closed for several months under government measures to control the corona virus infection.

But Deltic has now filed a notice appointing executives, which is a legal action that provides 10 working days of protection from lenders.

Scotinavian company Recom, which operates more than 100 bars and nightclubs across Denmark, Norway and Finland, and Graebel Capital, a private equity firm that previously supported sick companies including Monarch Airlines and British Steel, are in the process of acquiring Teltic. , But any contract is expected to involve management.

Here are some key dates for the UK Covid 19 restrictions.

The current locking in the UK is coming to an end, and the new reinforced layer system is coming into effect, with almost 99% of the UK going to two tough layers. Only the Isle of Wight, Cornwall and Skilly Islands have to move to Tier 1, with more than 32 million people in Tier 2 and more than 23 million in Tier 3.

New regulation comes into force in Wales. Pubs, restaurants and cafes will be barred from serving liquor, and will not be open to customers beyond 6 p.m. Businesses can provide takeaway service after 6pm, and can sell takeaway alcohol until 10pm if they have an off-license. Bingo halls, bowling alleys, soft sports centers, casinos, skating rinks and amusement arcades should also be closed.

The rule will be in force to allow four people from four different homes to meet in-house in hotels and restaurants. The results will be reviewed on December 17.


Ministers will review data on UK corona virus cases on a weekly basis throughout the stratification period, while the law requires that the tire allocation be systematically reviewed every fortnight. The first review point is December 16, and the next day new allotments were announced – decided by a cabinet committee headed by the Prime Minister. Boris Johnson said they will take effect on Saturday, December 19th.


Rules across the UK will be relaxed to create a ‘bubble’ of up to three houses for five days at Christmas so they can socialize indoors and stay overnight to enjoy the festive season together. In Scotland, a maximum of eight people will be allowed, but not those under 12 years of age. In Northern Ireland, the window has been extended to December 22-28 to allow additional travel time between countries.

Johnson has announced a “sunset” section on restrictions built in the UK, which expire on February 3 and will require the approval of MPs if they are to be extended to March.

Peter Marx, the CEO of Deltic, the company that founded the group in 2011 by buying up the collapsed luminaire nightclub business with the support of several private investors, has been a vocal critic of the government’s policy on nightclubs, which has not been fully operational since March. He said the government’s failure to provide additional support “slowly put us to death”.

In an effort to survive, Deltic has already cut 1,000 jobs and reused parts of its clubs as liquor stores. But in October Marx said the company would burn $ 1 million a month and that the money would not be out by the end of this year.

The Night Time Industries Association (NTIA), a trading organization, has said that without the necessary financial assistance, three-quarters of night-time economic businesses are now facing permanent closure. It says the government-sponsored Furlough program and subsidies of up to $ 3,000 a month are not enough to keep large clubs afloat, and its costs are higher than those allowances.

Clubs, including Egg London and Glasgow’s Sub Club, launched a campaign to keep the crowd alive.

NTIA CEO Michael Gill said: “Deltic is a prime example of a business stolen from Peter. [Marks] By restrictions. This is not for him or the credibility of the business, it is under control and not proportionally supported to allow him to survive. ”

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About the Author: Cory Weinberg

Cory Weinberg covers the intersection of tech and cities. That means digging into how startups and big tech companies are trying to reshape real estate, transportation, urban planning, and travel. Previously, he reported on Bay Area housing and commercial real estate for the San Francisco Business Times. He received a "best young journalist" award from the National Association of Real Estate Editors.

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