Scientists solve 16-year-old mystery of the blue nebula, which emerges from the collision of two stars

Scientists unravel the 16-year-old mystery of the blue nebula, which formed after a sun-like star ingested a small star

  • The blue nebula was discovered in 2004 and has since confused scientists
  • A new study reveals that it is the youngest known example of two stars merging into one
  • It formed when a star like the dying sun moved toward a smaller star
  • The big star drowned its companion and released a hot cloud Garbage
  • The collision fired hot debris into space, which was cut in half by a gas disk
  • The result was the formation of two cones, but one that looks like a circle facing the earth

The Blue Nebula has confused scientists for more than a decade, but new discoveries suggest it is the youngest known example of two stars merging into one.

In 2004 astronomers first discovered a mysterious object, which led them to discover what caused the formation of a circle of blue light around a star named TYC 2597-735-1.

In a new study, the team suggests that the ring is actually a cone and that the sun-like star is a glowing debris that forms after drowning a small star companion.

The hot debris cut in two by the gas disk was fired into space, and since only one of the cones faces the Earth, it appears as a central blue ring.

The Blue Nebula was discovered by scientists with NASA’s space-based Galaxy Evolution Explorer (Galaxy) 16 years ago, saying it was ‘unlike anything we’ve ever seen in our Milky Way galaxy’.

The images showed a large, dim gas, with a star shining brightly in the center.

Although it appears blue in the pictures, it does not actually give off the light visible to the human eye.

For more than a decade, the group has worked tirelessly to unravel its mystery.

The hot debris cut in two by the gas disk is fired into space, and since only one of the cones faces the Earth, it appears as a central blue ring.

The hot debris cut in two by the gas disk was fired into space, and since only one of the cones faces the Earth, it appears as a central blue ring.

Mark Seabert, an astronomer at the Carnegie Institution for Science and a member of the Galaxy team, said: ‘Every time we thought we had discovered this thing, something would say,’ No, that’s not right. ‘

‘This is a terrible thing as a scientist. But I like how unique this material is and the effort many people have made to find it. ‘

In a new study published online in the journal Nature on November 18, the team suggests that they have finally solved the puzzle.

The nebula is a relatively new star, about a thousand years old, with one star 100 times the size of our Sun and another 100 times more massive than Jupiter.

As the sun-like star was dying, it began to swell, pushing towards the tiny star object and eventually sinking into it.

Although the end of this violent phenomenon ends in two cones, they appear as a circle when viewed from Earth with each other.

Light was produced after the collision, which excited the hydrogen molecules so that they were irradiated with ultraviolet light and glowed bright enough to see GALEX over time.

Leading research writer Kerry Hodley, from David and the Ellen Lee Postdoctoral Scholar in Physics at Caltech, says, ‘It is very common for two stars to merge, but they are quickly obscured by a large amount of dust as the emission expands and cools in space. We can’t see what really happened. ‘

‘We think this material reflects the late stage of these transient events, and when the dust is finally cleared we will have better vision.

‘But we caught it before this process was too far away; Over time, the nebula will dissolve into galaxy media, and we cannot tell what happened. ‘

Advertising

You May Also Like

Cary Douglas

About the Author: Cary Douglas

Wayne Ma is a reporter who covers everything from oil trading to China's biggest conglomerates and technology companies. Originally from Chicago, he is a graduate of New York University's business and economic reporting program.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *