The six rules and curfew orders are likely to have a ‘zero effect’ on reducing contacts

The six rules and curfew orders are likely to have a ‘zero effect’ on reducing contacts

Similarly, the chance of having a Govt-19 positive person in a crowd of 50 in Somerset is one in eight (13 per cent), nine out of ten (86 per cent) in risk in Liverpool.

Designed to demonstrate the dangers of large crowds during the American football season, this model has been expanded to show the risks of event sizes across the UK, Italy and Switzerland.

Joshua Waits, a professor of biological sciences and physics at Georgia Tech who helped create the map, said it could be used by individuals to determine if they would like to visit a local pub or restaurant, or by policymakers imposing more localized locks.

“If you knew there was one of four possibilities … someone in that pub or restaurant had Kovit-19 … I hope it would change someone’s behavior,” he said.

He also said that low-risk areas should not be thought of as “carte blanches” to meet in very large groups without wearing a mask.

“It will only help to spread again,” he said.

“But it does mean that large crowds have completely different risk levels depending on the region, and that it really reflects the ongoing and diverse differences in the spread of epidemics.”

Scientists used local authority data from the Public Health UK (PHE).

Elsewhere, the risk of encountering someone with Covid-19 at the 50-person event with Darwin in Blackburn is four times higher than that of Bromley (85 percent and 23 percent).

In a crowd of 50 in County Durham, one person is 50 percent more likely to get the virus than Sofolk (18 percent and 67 percent).

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In Lancashire, the risk of a Govt-19 positive person attending an event with 25 people is twice as high as in neighboring North Yorkshire, which is 47 percent and 20 percent, respectively.

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Cary Douglas

About the Author: Cary Douglas

Wayne Ma is a reporter who covers everything from oil trading to China's biggest conglomerates and technology companies. Originally from Chicago, he is a graduate of New York University's business and economic reporting program.

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