Qatar Airways’ new Boeing 787-9 fleet – as far as we know

Qatar Airways Getty

Qatar Airways seeks to modernize its long-range fleet, placing significant orders for next-generation aircraft in recent years. The Middle East carrier is particularly focused on Airbus A350, Boeing 777X and Boeing 787-9 Dreamliner aircraft. However, the latter of these categories has seen an uncertain role since the Qatari order was issued. But how exactly has the situation developed since the order was first placed in 2016?

Qatar Airways has driven the short Boeing 787-8 variant of the Dreamliner since 2012. There are 30 of these types in its fleet. Photo: Getty Images

Strong commitment to naval modernization

The introduction of the Boeing 787-9 Dreamliner to the Qatar Airways Navy has been a long time coming. In October 2016, the airline announced the presence of Boeing 10 Boeing 777-300ER aircraft Placed an order for 30 787-9 Dreamliners. The total value for this order is approximately 12 billion billion. The airline was already the operator of the short 787-8 variant, with 30 in its fleet First flew the commercial type In November 2012.

From Start customers for both variants of the Airbus A350, An airline A further 28 Airbus A350-1000 aircraft are in the lineup. Overall, these orders represent a true statement aimed at modernizing Qatar Airways’ fleet. Plans to retire some old long-haul aircraft in support of new orders in the coming years also underscore this fact.

Upcoming retirement

ReutersFor example, in March 2019, the carrier announced that it would launch its Airbus A380 ‘Superjumbo’ aircraft as soon as it turned 10 years old. The withdrawal will begin in 2024. May 2019 also saw CH-Aviation Qatar plans to launch Airbus A330 by 2022 Qatar Airways’ latest orders have modified these two types to include modern and efficient aircraft.

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Qatar Airways plans to recall its Airbus A380 in 2024. Photo: Getty Images

Delivery delays

Despite this promising commitment, Qatar Airways’ Boeing 787-9 order has been subject to various problems since it was placed almost four years ago. For example, in October 2019, when Simple Flying was ready to deliver from Boeing’s vision, the airline was still there. Awaiting finalization of improvements to its new Qsuite Business class seat. This product was introduced in the carrier’s new Dreamliners.

Ann Thursday, December 26, 2019, Qatar seemed ready to accept the offer of a new aircraft. The four flew from Boeing’s Everett plant in Washington’s Painfield to the Qatari capital Doha. 28 followed Saturday.

However, as Simple Flying announced at the time, the plane Flew straight to the United States A day later. However, more than Boeing’s Bainfield base, the new Dreamliners flew to a storage facility in Victorville, California. It is assumed that the purpose of flying them to Qatar is simply to be registered as Qatari aircraft.

Boeing 737 Max, Southwest Airlines, Ground
Seven of Qatar’s ordered Boeing 787-9 Dreamliners are just a few of the hundreds currently stored in Victorville. Photo: Getty Images

Four of the seven aircraft stored were equipped with Qsuites and other components in Victorville Went back to Qatar for delivery on March 31st This year. The remaining three came soon. However, the ongoing corona virus infection has spread worldwide in order to almost stop commercial air travel.

As such, the aircraft introduced seven delivered Boeing 787-9 Dreamliners Delayed indefinitely Since the end of April. Since the remaining 23 aircraft are not yet in order to be delivered, and there are no launch pads for those who were, this saga is ready to continue in the near future.

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What are your experiences flying on Qatar Airways? When do you think the airline can launch its new 787-9 aircraft? Let us know your thoughts in the comments.

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Cory Weinberg

About the Author: Cory Weinberg

Cory Weinberg covers the intersection of tech and cities. That means digging into how startups and big tech companies are trying to reshape real estate, transportation, urban planning, and travel. Previously, he reported on Bay Area housing and commercial real estate for the San Francisco Business Times. He received a "best young journalist" award from the National Association of Real Estate Editors.

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